Recent discussions

  • William Montgomery

    test by admin
    In following article:
    Immediate Resuscitation in-Water or Delaying until on Land in Drowning: BLS
  • John Mouw

    The comparators are AED for CPR first after drowning. The reviewers acknowledged that good practice recommendation is based on "The rationale for a CPR first strategy is due to the hypoxic mechanism of cardiac arrest" despite lack of conclusive evidence. Experience has taught us that people (Instructors and rescuers) when reading a recommendation tend to follow and teach in the order a recommendation is presented. Understanding the importance of both CPR and AED, I suggest reversing the order of the sentences in the recommendation to: "CPR should be started first and continued until an AED has been obtained and is ready for use. When available, we recommend an AED is used in cardiac arrest following drowning in adults and children."
    In following article:
    AED First vs CPR First in Cardiac Arrest following Drowning BLS 856
  • John Mouw

    It may make for better understanding if the Intervention says, "Oxygen administration during pre-hospital resuscitation" and Comparison says, "No oxygen administration during pre-hospital resuscitation." Saying only "No oxygen administration before hospital arrival" does not imply during resuscitation attempts. These are two very different treatment considerations and comparisons.
    In following article:
    Oxygen administration following drowning BLS 856
  • ARTHUR JACKSON

    We seem to be waffling around the AHA suggestion of the collection of qualitative data from individual training through actual application in or out of hospital application. We need data on the whole resuscitation system and not just one part of it.
    In following article:
    Are cardiac arrest patient outcomes improved as a result of a member of the resuscitation team having attended an accredited advanced life support course: EIT 4000
  • Tunnel Vision Goggles

    Studies had to compare at least two different CPR methods from the eligible interventions; studies without a comparator were excluded. https://athomeautismproduct.com/#section-47c707a3
    In following article:
    CPR: Chest Compression to Ventilation Ratio - Bystander - Pediatric (PLS): Systematic Review
  • Alan Williams

    This is an important area as the investigation into, and reviews of pedagogic interventions is less developed and in my opinion primary research can be more subjective. This limitation does not reflect the review process, nor investigators and teams who share their primary research, and relates to challenges presented (methodological, measuring outcomes etc) when investigating learning and education. Despite these general challenges this is a worthy review and I look forward to reading the final article. I declare a potential conflict of interest as an elected member of the Resuscitation Council UK Executive Committee. Thanks. Alan
    In following article:
    Are cardiac arrest patient outcomes improved as a result of a member of the resuscitation team having attended an accredited advanced life support course: EIT 4000
  • benyam seifu

    thank you
    In following article:
    Effect of Briefing and Debriefing Following Neonatal Resuscitation on Patient/Clinician/Parent Outcomes (NLS #1562): Scoping Review
  • Dianne Hennig

    Having taught for 30+ years I can tell you that the blended approach is not ideal. As an Instructor, I can tell you that I end up having to repeat everything in the info section anyway because people don't remember as well when the info is independent of the practical. My strong recommendation based on many years of experience is that blended learning should NOT be used unless there is no other option. I may be a dinosaur but having seen the changes since the 1970's and getting feedback from my students - real learning takes place when info and practice are reinforced at a single training session, when done properly. That is my nickel's worth.
    In following article:
    Blended learning approach for life support education
  • Gerard Esposito

    The benefits of Blended Learning are apparent when you consider that the recipient of the course has the opportunity to review the material. When the student prepares with online material (Videos), it is much easier to understand new fabric if you have prepared before the in-classroom session. In October 2021, AHA attenuated the classroom session by providing online classroom videos. This allows classroom time for the educator to answer questions with concept examples and ensure that the student has achieved a level of understanding within their scope of practice. Many students downplay the importance of preparation before a class. Making the material available before the classroom session will encourage the student to study the material before class. When it comes to Distance skill learning and testing, there are options. AHA has allowed Virtual Training during the Covid Pandemic. For the classroom session, the Virtual process worked great. The Skills Practise and Testing was still dome in the classroom with the educator present. For Distance learning, some presumptions help the process work, even with skills testing. If a facility in a remote location wishes to train its staff, the Blended Learning method works well for the classroom session. With well-written materials and Video support, 75% of the classroom portion can be done online effectively (in my opinion, much better than classroom only.) If students have less confidence in a part of the course, they can review the material anytime. A properly placed webcam and an educator can view the same as they were present. If the educator has a similar device, they can even instruct as if they were present. As for Distance Skills, learning and testing would only require the proper manikins needed for practice and testing and a webcam. I enjoy teaching, and I want to reach as many students as possible; Not for monetary value, but to ensure well-managed, adequately trained individuals are available to help us all.
    In following article:
    Blended learning approach for life support education
  • Alexei Birkun

    The following randomised study (indexed in Scopus) seems to be eligible for the review, but wasn't covered: Birkun A.A., Altukhova I.V., Perova E.A., Frolova L.P., Abibullayev L.R. Blended Distance-classroom Training as an Alternative to the Traditional Classroom Training in Basic Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Automated External Defibrillation. Russian Sklifosovsky Journal "Emergency Medical Care". 2019;8(2):145-151. https://doi.org/10.23934/2223-9022-2019-8-2-145-151
    In following article:
    Blended learning approach for life support education
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